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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

Mrs. Helen Vari

Doctor of Laws, honoris causa

Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science
Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science 

For her extraordinary philanthropic and volunteer contributions to Canada through service to the arts, education, heritage preservation and health care, we are proud to confer upon Mrs. Helen Vari the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws.

Mrs. Vari has been described as a lifelong supporter of education, as well as a person committed to ensuring students of all abilities and backgrounds have opportunities to prosper. She spent her early life in Hungary and married her late husband, the Honourable George Vari, in Montreal, Quebec. Her travels taught her that, as she is known for saying, “a country cannot survive without engineers”. Indeed, the Vari’s engineering and construction company, SEFRI Construction International, offered employment and career success to hundreds of professional engineers who constructed airports, hotels and high-rise buildings around the world.  

The Vari’s strong belief in the opportunity provided by education led them to establish the Vari Foundation in 1984, of which Mrs. Vari is President. The foundation has helped students at many educational institutions with scholarship donations, as well as support for teaching programs and financial gifts. 

Along with her leadership of the Vari Foundation, she has served on the boards of the Ontario Heritage Foundation, the Canada Council for the Arts and the Alliance Française de Toronto. Her service is also international in scope through work on the Maison des étudiants Canadiens at the University of Paris as well as her role as the Founding President of the World Monuments Fund. 

For her philanthropic and volunteer work, she has received many international honours, including membership as an officer in l’Ordre de la Légion d’Honneur de France. She is an Officer in France’s Ordre National du Mérit, and a Commandant de l’Ordre de Malta. In Canada, Mrs. Vari is a recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Golden Jubilee and Diamond Jubilee medals.