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Ontario Tech acknowledges the lands and people of the Mississaugas of Scugog Island First Nation.

We are thankful to be welcome on these lands in friendship. The lands we are situated on are covered by the Williams Treaties and are the traditional territory of the Mississaugas, a branch of the greater Anishinaabeg Nation, including Algonquin, Ojibway, Odawa and Pottawatomi. These lands remain home to many Indigenous nations and peoples.

We acknowledge this land out of respect for the Indigenous nations who have cared for Turtle Island, also called North America, from before the arrival of settler peoples until this day. Most importantly, we acknowledge that the history of these lands has been tainted by poor treatment and a lack of friendship with the First Nations who call them home.

This history is something we are all affected by because we are all treaty people in Canada. We all have a shared history to reflect on, and each of us is affected by this history in different ways. Our past defines our present, but if we move forward as friends and allies, then it does not have to define our future.

Learn more about Indigenous Education and Cultural Services

Patrice Dutil, PH.D.

Patrice DutilPatrice Dutil is Professor (and former chair) in the Department of Politics and Public Administration at Ryerson University. Before joining the department in 2006, he was the Acting Executive Director and Director of Research at the Institute of Public Administration of Canada. He started his career in the Ministry of Intergovernmental Affairs in the Government of Ontario in 1987 as a policy advisor, and then joined TVOntario, the provincial educational broadcaster, where he worked both on corporate policy and in programming in a senior capacity. He joined the Institute of Public Administration of Canada as Director of Research in 1999.

Professor Dutil is passionate about Canadian cultural matters. In 1991, he founded and edited for five years the monthly Literary Review of Canada. It is now celebrating its 24th year in publication. He is currently President of the Champlain Society, a century-old institution that publishes each year documentary materials that describe Canada's past as it was seen by our ancestors.

His works include Searching For Leadership: Secretaries to Cabinet in Canada, The Service State: Rhetoric, Reality and Promise, and The Guardian: Perspectives on the Ministry of Finance of Ontario as well as books on diverse aspects of Canadian political history. Since 2015, he has been the editor of Canadian Government Executive magazine (www.canadiangovernmentexecutive.ca). Professor Dutil is passionate about Canadian cultural matters. In 1991, he founded and edited for five years the monthly Literary Review of Canada. It is now celebrating its 25th year in publication. He is also President of the Champlain Society, a century-old institution that publishes each year documentary materials that describe Canada's past as it was seen by our ancestors. He pursued his BA at York University, his Master's at the Université de Montreal and his Ph.D. at York University.